Eric D. Snider (@EricDSnider )

Eric D. Snider

Bio Writer, emeritus film critic, bon vivant, American, gay, Latter-day Saint (@EricLDSnider). Co-hosted @MovieBS. California boy, Portland resident, Utah man.
Location Provo
Tweets 92,0K
Followers 14,7K
Following 574
Account created 14-05-2008 06:45:58
ID 14770131

Twitter Web App : I just saw the phrase "Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hip-Hop Improv Group" and can't stop shuddering.

Twitter Web App : Anybody ever have a Twitter crush that faded once you saw more of the person's tweets? Me either, just wondering.

Twitter Web App : This is hilarious, though I guess it will seem less funny when it's repeated with a straight face by your gullible relatives. twitter.com/ddale8/status/…

Twitter Web App : Protestors Criticized For Looting Businesses Without Forming Private Equity Firm First bit.ly/2AeY0zK

Twitter Web App : So I went looking to see how that phrase comes out when those sermons are translated into Spanish. Literal "loud laughter" would just be "risa fuerte," but this "loud laughter" is rendered "las risotadas." And so I was curious what THAT literally means. And so on.

Twitter Web App : The reason for the question is that preachers (in English) often warn against "loud laughter." But in context, it seems it's not the literal volume of the laughing that's the problem. "Loud" here seems to mean inappropriate, tacky, obnoxious.

Twitter Web App : Jacob Moffat Issa LΓ³pez Yes, but it seems to mean more than just the literal decibel level of the laughter. And yes, I'm exploring how "loud laughter" (in a religious sense) is translated in other languages to get at what the intended meaning of it is.

Twitter Web App : Spanish-speaking amigos, can you help me with the term "las risotadas"? It's translating as "laughter," but it seems to mean more than mere laughter (which is also "la risa"). What's the nuance here?

Twitter Web App : Every Vice documentary:

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